Decorative
CSD Permits2018-05-24T14:13:18+00:00

Permit Applications and Fees

Fire-Protection System Permits

Fire Protection System Permit Application Form

Click here to download an application, and then email to eplan-fire@LFRA.org or fax to (970) 962-2537.

 

When is a Fire-Protection System Permit Needed?

During the development and building permit processes, it will be determined if fire-protection system permits (fire alarms and/or fire suppression) are required for the project. These requirements are specified in the locally adopted Fire and Building codes. Fire-protection system requirements from the 2012 IFC based on Occupancy Types can be downloaded by clicking here.

LFRA will specify on building-permit comments when new construction is required to have fire-protection systems and permits; for building remodels or additions, the applicant contacts licensed fire-protection contractors to conduct a site visit and determine if system modifications are required.

Fire-protection system permits are required whenever a new system is installed or when an existing system is modified. Permit application is made directly to LFRA Community Safety Division. The contractor submitting the application must have a current contractor license with LFRA.

Fire-protection systems include fire sprinklers, fire alarm, spray (paint) booth suppression, cooking extinguishing systems, clean-agent suppression, fire pumps, etc.

State Suppression Requirements

In 2016, the Colorado Division of Fire Prevention and Control (DFPC) implemented a state registration process for four types of Fire Suppression System Contractors: Fire Suppression Systems, Residential Fire Suppression Systems, Underground and Backflow. Licenses are required for any individual or company that employs individuals who physically work on, design, test, inspect or install any part of a fire suppression system in commercial, civil or residential occupancies.

Additionally, Fire Sprinkler Fitters are required to be registered with DFPC to perform work on fire suppression systems. Sprinkler Fitters may only work under the employ of a registered Fire Suppression System Contractor or be self-employed and registered as a Fire Suppression System Contractor.

The Colorado Fire Suppression System Rules can be accessed by clicking here.

What are Permit Submittal Requirements?

Fire-protection system permit applications must be submitted to LFRA by a licensed fire-protection contractor. After the review is completed, the contractor’s designated employees are the only people authorized to pick up the fire permit, LFRA-approved drawings and written Conditions of Approval.

ALL SUBMITTALS MUST INCLUDE THE PERMIT APPLICATION. The application is available in person from the Community Safety Division or you can download the permit by clicking here.

Permit plan submittals may be made either electronically or via hard (paper) copies. Electrical plans and the completed application can be submitted to: Eplan-fire@LFRA.org

Hard copies may be dropped off or mailed to LFRA Community Safety Division at 410 E. 5th St., Loveland, CO 80537.

With electronic submittals, LFRA will email the approved, electronically stamped drawings to the applicant, and the applicant prints one full-size (24×36-inch) set of drawings for LFRA records and brings it to LFRA when paying for the permit. Additionally, a copy of the approved, electronically stamped drawings, along with the LFRA permit and written conditions of approval, must be on site during construction and LFRA inspections.

What Must be Provided with Suppression and Alarm Submittals?

Fire alarm permit submittals shall include the following:

  • Valid LFRA contractor’s license
  • Completed permit application with correct address and valuation
  • Three sets of shop drawings (minimum 1/8” scale)
  • PE or NICET Level III or IV stamp on all drawings
  • Minimum of one set of material cut sheets
  • Voltage drop calculations
  • Battery calculations
  • Symbol list
  • Riser diagram

Fire sprinkler permit submittals shall include the following:

  • Valid LFRA contractor’s license
  • State Suppression License
  • Completed permit application with correct address and valuation
  • Three sets of shop drawings (minimum 1/8” scale)
  • PE or NICET Level III or IV stamp on all drawings
  • Water supply information
  • Minimum of one set of material cut sheets
  • Hydraulic calculations
  • State of Colorado Registered Fire Suppression System Contractor number, issued by the Colorado Division of Fire Prevention and Control

The above list is not intended to be inclusive of all requirements for a fire-protection submittal, but rather a guide to indicate the minimum requirements.

Are the Requirements the Same for Smaller Sprinkler Projects?

If a fire sprinkler contractor is proposing to make modifications to an existing fire sprinkler system that are limited to affecting 10 or fewer sprinklers, the permit submittal may include the LFRA permit application and a “Letter of Scope” describing the modifications. This applies to 10 or fewer sprinklers that will be added, relocated and/or removed.

If proposed modifications will affect more than 10 sprinklers, a full permit submittal is required (see submittal list above).

How Much Time is Needed to Review the Submittal?

Plans typically are reviewed within 15 working days.

How do Contractors Pick Up their Permit?

The contractor is notified by phone when reviewed drawings, written Conditions of Approval (comments) from LFRA specific to that project, and the permit itself are ready to be picked up. The contractor pays the permit fees when picking up the permit, LFRA-stamped drawings and Conditions. Payment may be made by check or credit card.

The permit and drawings (including manufacturers’ specification sheets and, for suppression systems, hydraulic calculations) approved and stamped by LFRA must remain on site at all times until final inspections are completed by LFRA.

It is imperative that fire-protection system installers read and comply with all Conditions of Approval and any redlined directions on the drawings. By meeting all the Conditions, the contractor will be prepared for LFRA’s rough and final inspections.

How do Contractors Schedule Inspections?

Fire sprinkler rough and hydrostatic inspections are required. The fire sprinkler contractor calls LFRA to schedule rough/hydrostatic inspections, at (970) 962-2537, at least 48 hours in advance of the requested inspection time.

Rough inspections for fire alarm wiring are required and are completed by the applicable Building Departments: City of Loveland, unincorporated Larimer County or Town of Johnstown. The fire alarm contractor is responsible for contacting the appropriate Building Department for rough alarm wiring inspections. Rough wiring inspection approval is required prior to final fire alarm inspection by LFRA.

Final inspections consisting of general construction and fire-protection systems (sprinkler, alarm, commercial kitchen suppression, flammable finish operations) must be scheduled for the same time and all contractors must be present for testing and inspecting. The general contractor is responsible for scheduling this final inspection and he/she must provide the project address and all permit numbers when requesting inspections. Inspections must be scheduled at least 48 hours in advance by calling LFRA at (970) 962-2537. Contacting LFRA further in advance will allow more flexibility in scheduling for the contractor(s).

Final inspections for only fire-suppression systems (there is no associated building permit) may be scheduled by the fire-protection contractor. Inspections must be scheduled at least 48 hours in advance by calling LFRA at (970) 962-2537.

All LFRA inspections must be passed and approved prior to closing the permit and the applicable Building Department issuing a Certificate of Occupancy or Temporary Certificate of Occupancy.

Building Permits

Building Permit Application Form

Click here to download an application, and then email to eplan-fire@LFRA.org or fax to (970) 962-2912.

 

About Building Permits

Loveland Fire Rescue Authority’s Community Safety Division reviews building permit submittals for construction projects within three governmental jurisdictions: 

  • the City of Loveland
  • unincorporated Larimer County in the Loveland Rural Fire Protection District
  • the Town of Johnstown near Interstate 25 and US Highway 34 (Thompson River Ranch and 2534) in the Loveland Rural Fire Protection District

If you need to obtain a building permit for property located in the Loveland Rural Fire Protection District in either unincorporated Larimer County or the Town of Johnstown, you will need a separate building permit issued by LFRA; this is in addition to and separate from the building permit issued by Johnstown or Larimer County building departments. Within the City of Loveland, the LFRA review is included in the city’s Building Division permit process; a separate permit from LFRA is not required.

When are Building Permits Required?

The International Building Code specifies that building permits are required to “construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, demolish, or change the occupancy of a building or structure, or to erect, install, enlarge, alter, repair, remove, convert or replace any electrical, gas, mechanical or plumbing system” regulated by the IBC (2012 IBC, Section 105.1).

Before beginning any new-construction or remodel project, the applicant must submit application and required drawings to obtain building permits and reviewed, approved drawings.

For projects in the City of Loveland, LFRA is part of a multi-department review process and does not issue a separate building permit. The City’s Building Division issues building permits for projects within the city.

For projects in Johnstown or unincorporated Larimer County, LFRA will issue its own, separate building permit, after reviewing drawings submitted by the architect, general contractor or business owner. The LFRA permit is separate from and in addition to, the building permit issued by Johnstown or Larimer County building departments. The LFRA building permit must be on site at all times during the construction process.

What Drawings are Required to be Submitted for Review and Issuance of a Building Permit?

Plans are to be stamped by a Colorado licensed design professional and all plans are to be drawn to scale.

The submittal must include:

  1. Code Plan showing exit paths, exit travel distance, uses of rooms or areas, square footage of rooms or areas, occupancy group per room with occupant load per room or area, fire extinguisher locations, and exterior exit pathways leading to a “public way.” The Code Plan shall identify the construction type, allowable area and height, actual area and height, and any required separations.
  2. Floor plans for each level:
    • Indicate uses of all rooms or areas on floor plans.
    • If it is a tenant finish in a portion of building, include key plan of entire building.
    • Show square footage of each room
    • Door and window schedules showing hardware types.
    • New stairways shall have section and detail plans showing rise, run, headroom, handrail details and extensions.
    • All equipment shall be shown (industrial machines, kitchen equipment, etc.).
    • Ceiling plans must show all exit signs locations and provisions for exit illumination (may be shown on Code Plan).
    • Provide fire-rated assemblies and listing number of such assemblies.
  3. Exterior elevations
  4. For new buildings, provide building sections.
  5. HVAC plans showing fire/smoke damper locations (if required) and BTUs of appliances.
  6. Plumbing plans showing gas piping (where occurs).
  7. Electrical plans showing electrical panel location, receptacles, all lighting and pertinent equipment (for smaller projects, this information can be indicated on the floor plan).
  8. For tenant finish projects in “strip mall or condominium situations, provide a key plan showing the location of the tenant space and occupancy groups of tenants on each side and above or below the space being finished.

Two sets of stamped drawings must be submitted directly to LFRA for review and issuance of a building permit (Johnstown and unincorporated Larimer County projects).

ALL SUBMITTALS FOR LARIMER COUNTY AND JOHNSTOWN MUST INCLUDE THE LFRA PERMIT APPLICATION. (In the City of Loveland, the Building Division processes the permit application.) The LFRA application is available in person from the Community Safety Division or may be printed from this link: LINK

Permit drawings may be submitted either electronically or via hard (paper) copies. Electrical plans and the completed application can be submitted to: Eplan-fire@LFRA.org. Hard copies may be dropped off or mailed to LFRA Community Safety Division at 410 E. 5th St., Loveland, CO 80537.

With electronic submittals, LFRA will email the approved, electronically stamped drawings to the applicant, and the applicant prints one full-size (24×36-inch) set of drawings for LFRA records and brings it to LFRA when paying for the building permit. Additionally, a copy of the approved, electronically stamped drawings must be on site during construction and LFRA inspections.

Who Can Prepare the Submittal Drawings?

Per Colorado law, permit drawings typically must be prepared and stamped by a licensed design professional. There are some exceptions for projects of smaller scope. Specific requirements per State law can be found in the Colorado Handbook for Building Officials.

How Much Time Is Needed to Review the Submittal?

Most plans are reviewed within 15 working days.

How Do Contractors Pick up their Permit?

The contractor is notified by phone when reviewed drawings, written Conditions of Approval (comments) from LFRA specific to that project, and the permit itself are ready to be picked up. The contractor pays the permit fees when picking up the permit, LFRA-stamped drawings and Conditions. Payment may be made by check or credit card.

The LFRA permit, LFRA-stamped drawings and written Conditions must remain on site at all times until final inspections are completed by LFRA.

It is imperative that the general contractor read and comply with all Conditions of Approval and any redlined directions on the drawings. By meeting all the Conditions, the contractor will be prepared for LFRA’s inspections.

How Do Contractors Schedule Inspections?

Final inspections consisting of general construction and fire protection systems must be scheduled for the same time and all contractors must be present for testing and inspecting. The general contractor is responsible for scheduling this final inspection and he/she must provide the project address and all permit numbers when requesting inspections. Inspections must be scheduled at least 48 hours in advance by calling LFRA at (970) 962-2537. Contacting LFRA further in advance will allow more flexibility in scheduling for the contractor(s).

If the construction project does not include fire protection system permits, the general contractors just schedules the final building permit inspection with LFRA. Inspections must be scheduled at least 48 hours in advance by calling LFRA at (970) 962-2537. Contacting LFRA further in advance will allow more flexibility in scheduling for the contractor(s).

How Can I Get Information from the Building Departments?

For general information regarding building permits and inspections, contact the appropriate Building Department:

Is that All I Need?

Remember that additional approvals may be necessary to start a business: a sales tax license, utility service, food vendor license, liquor license and sign permits are a few examples that may be required. Planning or Building staff in the three jurisdictions can help direct you if you have questions.

 

Permit Fees

Consolidated Fee Schedule

Click here to download the Consolidated Fee Schedule

Fee Estimator Worksheet

Click here to download the LFRA Fee Estimator Worksheet, or call the Community Safety Division at (970) 962-2537 for an estimate.

Please note that these are estimates only and not cost quotes, as the project valuation can change, fee schedules may change, etc. It is the responsibility of the applicant or contractor to confirm the actual permit fees with CSD, if desired, prior to payment and issuance of permit.

Capital Improvement Impact Fees

Click here to download an Impact Fee Handout.

Loveland Fire Rescue Authority (LFRA) provides fire protection, emergency medical services, hazardous materials mitigation, community safety services and public education in a 194 square-mile area that includes the City of Loveland, Town of Johnstown “25/34” area and surrounding unincorporated Larimer County.

The LFRA service area is experiencing a 2 to 2.5 percent annual population growth; projections assume this will continue annually from 2018-2026. This increase has resulted in corresponding construction of residential subdivisions and commercial structures, and a 6 percent annual increase in call volume each of those five years within the jurisdiction (6,400 emergency responses in 2013, 8,393 calls in 2017). However, LFRA, like other fire districts throughout the state, has not been able to realize the full property tax revenue due to the Gallagher/TABOR legislation.

In 2016, the Colorado Legislature passed the Public Safety Fairness Act allowing fire districts to charge capital improvement impact fees to assist capital development of fire and emergency medical service resources to accommodate community growth. LFRA received approval from its board of directors, the Johnstown Town Council and Larimer County Board of Commissioners to implement the impact fee, becoming one of the first fire departments in the state to have access to the funding. Impact fee approval does not require approval from the voters. Neighboring fire districts in Larimer County are also working to approve impact fees.

Within the City of Loveland, development capitol expansion fees (CEFs) have funded the expansion of government services, including fire services, for over 20 years; the City CEFs are the same rate as the new impact fees for the rest of the LFRA response area.

The population of Larimer County is expected to double from the current 340,000 to approximately 680,000 in the next 30 years; a significant portion of this growth will be in the Loveland Fire jurisdiction. Through extensive planning, LFRA has identified that three additional fire stations will need to be constructed and staffed in the next 15 years, in order to meet the additional demand for fire protection and emergency services. Additionally, the Loveland fire training center and the existing Fire Station 3 will need to be replaced. The impact fee will enable LFRA to build capital infrastructure, purchase new apparatus and equipment associated with new development, and may defer a mil levy increase.

A Nexus study (prepared by BBC Research & Consulting) on the need and feasibility of impact fees produced a fee schedule of $0.30 per square foot for a commercial building and $0.03 per square foot for industrial use. Residential fees are $895.00 for a single-family structure and $622.00 per dwelling unit for a multi-family building.

The fee will be collected beginning April 2, 2018 on Johnstown projects and July 1, 2018, on projects in unincorporated Larimer County.

The impact fee is not charged for fire-protection systems, such as automatic fire sprinklers or fire alarms.

 

What is Colorado HB1088 (“Public Safety Fairness Act”)?

CONCERNING THE AUTHORIZATION FOR A FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT TO IMPOSE AN IMPACT FEE ON NEW DEVELOPMENT, AND, IN CONNECTION THEREWITH, ENACTING THE “PUBLIC SAFETY FAIRNESS ACT”.

The bill authorizes the board of a fire protection district to impose an impact fee on the construction of new buildings, structures, facilities or improvements, on previously improved or on unimproved real property, if the impact fee is:

  • Reasonably related to the overall cost of the fire protection district’s services; and
  • Imposed in accordance with a fee schedule that is legislatively adopted by the board and that applies to all construction of new buildings, structures, facilities, or improvements.

Click here to read HB1088.

 

When must the fire impact fee be paid?

Fees are to be collected from properties within the Loveland Rural Fire Protection District when building permits are issued for new structures. For residential buildings, this will be when the owner obtains a building permit at Larimer County or the Town of Johnstown, as applicable. For industrial or commercial buildings in unincorporated Larimer County, the fee will be paid when the applicant obtains a building permit at the Larimer County Building Department. For industrial or commercial buildings in Johnstown, the fee will be paid at the LFRA Community Safety Division, when the applicant obtains a building permit from the fire department.

 

How much is the impact fee for a residential building?

The fee is $895.00 for a single-family home and $622.00 per dwelling unit for a multi-family residential structure. A “dwelling” is defined as any building or portion thereof that is used as the private residence or sleeping place for one or more people.

 

How much is the impact fee for industrial property?

The fee for an industrial building is $0.03 per square foot. The impact fee for a 10,000 square foot industrial building would be $300.00 (10,000 x 0.03). Examples of “industrial” uses include but are not limited to manufacturing, fabricating, and oil and gas sites.

 

How much is the impact fee for a commercial building?

The fee for commercial development is calculated by multiplying the total square footage by 0.30. As an example, the impact fee for a 15,000 square foot commercial building would be $4,500.00 Examples of “commercial” uses include but are not limited to churches, hotels, motels, schools, office and professional buildings, storage, banks, restaurants, nightclubs, retail stores, theaters and indoor sports facilities.

 

What is the impact fee for “mixed-use” buildings?

If a building is part-Commercial use and part-Industrial use, the impact fee will be assessed based on the majority use of the building (predominant square footage).  If a building is combined residential use and either Commercial or Industrial use, the impact fee will be assessed using number of residential units, combined with square footage of Commercial or Industrial use.

 

Does the Fire District need to review my building plans?

Yes: The LFRA Community Safety Division reviews building plans and issues permits for all commercial, industrial and multi-family buildings in its jurisdiction. Impact fees are to be collected from properties within the Loveland Rural Fire Protection District when building permits are issued (Town of Johnstown and unincorporated Larimer County).

No: While LFRA does not issue building permits for construction of single-family homes or duplexes, the appropriate building departments (Town of Johnstown and Larimer County), do issue permits for one- and two-family homes, and they will collect impact fees on behalf of LFRA when the applicant obtains a residential building permit.

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